Aga saga

Guests occasionally ask me what my own house is like. Is it as detailed as The Pip? No, it’s not. My house is quite different both in age and style, but I play here as well. Here is an example. In the kitchen was a slightly dated wall of kitchen units.

agaIt was thrilling to remove. Most of the timber could be reused in other projects. Behind the panelling was an old chimney opening. I sort of knew it would be there, since I could see the chimney poking up on the roof, but a delightful surprise to see it all the same. I knocked all the render off, exposing the brick. A couple of bricks were damaged from the dynabolts someone had put in when they covered it all over. I mortared them back. The steel covering the sides is just a sheet of galvanised iron which I glued with Liquid Nails and jammed a few pieces of wood against until it set. No pic of these stages, forgot! This project is a few years old and I have only some stages photographed.

aga 5I adore the look of Agas, but at a pricetag of around 20,000 I thought I could create the look for a pittance. Construction has already begun. Essentially, this is the same construction technique as I might use for building a kitchen cupboard, or a built in cabinet anywhere. First I made a base, to get it off the floor. I am using 140x19mm pine for the base.  The little tiles on the floor are staying. I started to chip them off at the front but I have never experienced such tough glue. No need to remove, anyway.

aga 3Then I added uprights to a good height. These are 70x19mm. Or they might even be 42×19? Hard to tell, but they don’t need to be overly big. Let’s say they are 70mm.The front panel is hardwood. No reason, you don’t have to. Not even sure why I did. Less marking when you kick it? I happened to have it hanging around? Can’t remember. It is a while since I did this. Looks like a recycled piece to me, with the old holes.

aga 7The top bars I screwed on from the back before I lifted it in place. Now comes a miracle: Almost done. Essentially, line it, put in shelves, face frame. The cupboard doors are actually the old doors from the kitchen I removed. They are sturdy and do not warp. They were a little small however so I screwed on some plywood and bit of MDF which I bevelled with my circular saw. So so sorry about lacking pics for these stages. I really carefully filled and sanded all screwholes. The top is ordinary pine floorboards. I will show all the missing stages in different projects, it all repeats anyway. Same, same.

aga 10Open the doors… A cupboard!

aga 11I undercoated, sanded, painted black several coats… Matte metal is the idea. I also needed some bits, such as the old gage.

aga 14aga 15The concrete hearth needed tiling and I chose a large shiny tile, with the hope that the stove would reflect in it. Yes, it does.

aga 16The rail is a shower rail. The trim on the sides is an angled length of aluminium just to ”hem” the cut metal to the brick. A good finish, I think. Basically if you make something black and matte, and even hint at it being a stove, people believe it. If you put a cooking pot on top, there is no question at all.

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